One of the most successful life-forms on the planet, Emiliania huxleyi is a single-celled organism visible only under a microscope. The most abundant species of coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi, belongs to the order Isochrysidales and family Noëlaerhabdaceae. When sunlight reflects off them, it gives the sea a characteristic turquoise appearance. Southern Ocean fronts are indicated with their approximate summer (January–March) locations. NASA’s Terra satellite captured a “bloom” of phytoplankton in Norway’s Hardangerfjord. The species Emiliania huxleyi (Figure 2(g)) is the most prominent member of this group and forms blooms in both coastal and open-ocean regions. The adaptive significance of this life cycle is not understood. It is found in temperate , subtropical , and tropical oceans. If it wasn't for phytoplankton doing this, and organisms like Emiliania Huxleyi, we would basically be cooked.

Microscopic plant-like organisms called phytoplankton support the diversity of life in the ocean. “There doesn’t necessarily need to be as much of it as you might think, because Ehux, as we call it, sheds lots of calcium carbonate scales into the surrounding water”, says the plankton researcher Lars-Johan Naustvoll.

[5] This makes E. huxleyi an important part of the planktonic base of a large proportion of marine food webs . It has attracted the attention of scientists from fields as diverse as geology, biogeography, paleoclimatology, ecophysiology, material science, and medicine. Grazing and faecal pellet production by the copepods Calanus helgolandicus and Pseudocalanus elongatus, feeding on the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, were measured under defined laboratory conditions, together with the chemical characteristics and sinking rates of the faecal pellets produced. The Emiliania huxleyi print is supplied mounted in white acid free board, backed and wrapped in cellophane; See a really interesting video on 'The Importance of Plankton' Tomoko Komada, Professor of Chemistry, San Francisco State University: Ocean acidification is a consequence of increased atmospheric CO 2 levels, which is caused by continued burning of fossil fuels by human activity. Shields sub-parallel; highly variable tube width; usually with a grill in the central area; usually robust distal shield elements (<50% of distal shield area is slits) E. huxleyi type A. E. huxleyi type A overcalcified. Emiliania huxleyi, harmless microorganisms, have turned the water a … 6.3.1 Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta, Coccolithophyceae, Isochrysidales). The surface of this microscopic unicellular alga is covered in small calcium carbonate scales. Coccolithophores exhibit highly complex life cycles in which haploid, diploid, and polyploid stages, some bearing different types of coccoliths, alternate with one another. One of the most successful life-forms on the planet, Emiliania huxleyi is a single-celled organism visible only under a microscope. The calcifying alga Emiliania huxleyi is currently blooming, as it often does in spring. Seen through a microscope: Emiliania Huxleyi is around 5 micrometres, or 5 thousandths of a millimetre, long. It is one of thousands of different photosynthetic plankton that freely drift in the euphotic zone of the ocean, forming the basis of virtually all marine food webs. Schematic overview of the Emiliania huxleyi presence and absence from 11 oceanographic surveys in the Southern Ocean from 1947 to 2009. Emiliania huxleyi, often abbreviated "EHUX", is a species of coccolithophore with a global distribution from the tropics to subarctic waters. Emiliania huxleyi, often abbreviated "EHUX", is a species of coccolithophore with a global distribution from the tropics to subarctic waters. It is one of thousands of different photosynthetic plankton that freely drift in the euphotic zone of the ocean, forming the basis of virtually all marine food webs.

Young1998_emiliania.jpg; Daughter taxa: (blue => in age window 0-800Ma) Granddaughter taxa : Emiliania huxleyi A group. Coccolithophores, among which Emiliania huxleyi (E. huxleyi) is the most abundant and widespread species, are considered to be the most productive calcifying organism on earth. The 2004-research publication linking blooms of Emiliania huxleyi in the Barents Sea with global warming points to the five-year continuous stretch of blooms that occurred from 1999 to 2003. Blooms of Cruise year sector of the Southern Ocean, and associated reference are presented.